faineemae
thesoupofthedayiswhiskey:

thepsychoticfuckingbiotic:

faineemae:

ok this draws the line, stop it now

hommus

So, slightly off topic from the post, but notice how it says “non-GMO varified.” That’s a lovely marketing tactic by this fun little organic food trend to essentially rack up prices for the lulz. In the united states, the only GMO (or, more accurately, transgenic, which is generally what we are talking about when we say GMO, because transgenic is much more specific and the thing that’s actually being debated, because *newsflash* cross breeding seeds is also genetic modifcation and we’ve been doing that since we started to figure agriculture out). If your product doesn’t have corn, papaya *from Hawaii*, squash, cotton, canola, or soybeans in it, it isn’t a transgenic food if you bought it from a store in the US. There’s no such thing as a transgenic strawberry or tomato at the store. Nor is there a transgenic chic pea. Companies are taking full advantage of our complete ignorance as to how and where our food was produced and the scare that GMO’s are bad news bears for the sake of *you guessed it* profit. Definitely side-eye items that are expensive and have labels like “GMO free” and “certified organic.” It’ll take a tiny bit of research, but you can save yourself a lotta bit of money by keeping an eye on these sorts of things.

thesoupofthedayiswhiskey:

thepsychoticfuckingbiotic:

faineemae:

ok this draws the line, stop it now

hommus

So, slightly off topic from the post, but notice how it says “non-GMO varified.” That’s a lovely marketing tactic by this fun little organic food trend to essentially rack up prices for the lulz. In the united states, the only GMO (or, more accurately, transgenic, which is generally what we are talking about when we say GMO, because transgenic is much more specific and the thing that’s actually being debated, because *newsflash* cross breeding seeds is also genetic modifcation and we’ve been doing that since we started to figure agriculture out). If your product doesn’t have corn, papaya *from Hawaii*, squash, cotton, canola, or soybeans in it, it isn’t a transgenic food if you bought it from a store in the US. There’s no such thing as a transgenic strawberry or tomato at the store. Nor is there a transgenic chic pea. Companies are taking full advantage of our complete ignorance as to how and where our food was produced and the scare that GMO’s are bad news bears for the sake of *you guessed it* profit. Definitely side-eye items that are expensive and have labels like “GMO free” and “certified organic.” It’ll take a tiny bit of research, but you can save yourself a lotta bit of money by keeping an eye on these sorts of things.

earthstory
earthstory:

Green, slimy, beach balls.This is a photo from Dee Why Beach, on Australia’s East Coast north of Sydney. Yeah, it’s covered with small green balls. This is actually a bloom of a unique type of algae called marumo (or marimo depending on who is spelling it). The name was given by a Japanese botanist in the late 1800 s and translates to “bouncy play ball” or something like that. In Iceland they’re referred to as kúluskítur, which I’m told translates to “ball muck”.The algae is growing on rocks. The algae grows around the rock mostly covering it, and then on occasion the algae/rock will be hit by the right current to knock it loose, sending it rolling around the ocean floor and possibly up onto the coastline.These algae balls have been seen around the world, but only on rare occasions, sometimes with years in-between sightings.-JBBImage credit: 7 newsReferences:http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20142409-26225.htmlhttps://au.news.yahoo.com/nsw/a/25061829/ufos-on-sydney-beach/http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/thousands-strange-green-balls-appeared-overnight-beach-australia-180952811/?no-ist

earthstory:

Green, slimy, beach balls.

This is a photo from Dee Why Beach, on Australia’s East Coast north of Sydney. Yeah, it’s covered with small green balls. 

This is actually a bloom of a unique type of algae called marumo (or marimo depending on who is spelling it). The name was given by a Japanese botanist in the late 1800 s and translates to “bouncy play ball” or something like that. In Iceland they’re referred to as kúluskítur, which I’m told translates to “ball muck”.

The algae is growing on rocks. The algae grows around the rock mostly covering it, and then on occasion the algae/rock will be hit by the right current to knock it loose, sending it rolling around the ocean floor and possibly up onto the coastline.

These algae balls have been seen around the world, but only on rare occasions, sometimes with years in-between sightings.

-JBB

Image credit: 7 news

References:
http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20142409-26225.html
https://au.news.yahoo.com/nsw/a/25061829/ufos-on-sydney-beach/
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/thousands-strange-green-balls-appeared-overnight-beach-australia-180952811/?no-ist